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Constantinople Mint
Constantine I (A.D.307-337)
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ER523 - Constantine I, Consecration of, (A.D. 307-337), AE4, 1.71g., 16mm, Constantinople mint (Istanbul, Turkey), before A.D. 337-347, veiled head of Constantine right, DV (Divus) CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, rev., Constantine veiled and wrapped within robe on Quadriga galloping right, the manus dei (Hand of God) extending down from heaven to grasp his extended right hand, CONS in exergue, (RIC 37), well centered but rough in parts, almost extremely fine. $75

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ER525 - Constantine I, Consecration of, (A.D. 307-337), AE4, 1.46g., 15mm, Constantinople mint (Istanbul, Turkey), before A.D. 337-347, veiled head of Constantine right, DV (Divus) CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, rev., Constantine veiled and wrapped within robe on Quadriga galloping right, the manus dei (Hand of God) extending down from heaven to grasp his extended right hand, CONS in exergue, (RIC 37), almost extremely fine, weak in parts. $125

This scene is strongly reminiscence of the Old Testament prophet Elijah's ascent to heaven on a chariot of horses and fire. It is also perhaps telling of Constantine's own and or his successors idea of his place within the Christian 'pantheon', depicting him in the guise of a paramount prophet of the Old Testament. Technically a type commemorating the Divine Status of Constantine the Great, this coin exemplifies the ambiguity that surrounds the emperors relationship with early Christianity. Though he died a Christian he is here named as Divine on his posthumous coinage, a very pagan concept. As Mattingly remarked "a new shade of meaning must have been attached to the term".

Click on image to enlarge.

ER528 - Constantine I, Consecration of, (A.D. 307-337), AE4, 1.55g., 15mm, Constantinople mint (Istanbul, Turkey), before A.D. 337-347, veiled head of Constantine right, DV (Divus) CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, rev., Constantine veiled and wrapped within robe on Quadriga galloping right, the manus dei (Hand of God) extending down from heaven to grasp his extended right hand, CONS in exergue, (RIC 37), extremely fine, rough surfaces in part on reverse. $125

This scene is strongly reminiscence of the Old Testament prophet Elijah's ascent to heaven on a chariot of horses and fire. It is also perhaps telling of Constantine's own and or his successors idea of his place within the Christian 'pantheon', depicting him in the guise of a paramount prophet of the Old Testament. Technically a type commemorating the Divine Status of Constantine the Great, this coin exemplifies the ambiguity that surrounds the emperors relationship with early Christianity. Though he died a Christian he is here named as Divine on his posthumous coinage, a very pagan concept. As Mattingly remarked "a new shade of meaning must have been attached to the term".